Notable Canadians who Died in 2008

Selected from a month-by-month list drawn up by the London Free Press:

Milt Dunnell, 102, Toronto Star legend and Hall of Fame journalist known for his deft turn of phrase and encyclopedic breadth of experience.
[. . .]
Robert Weaver, 87, anthologist, broadcaster and literary editor who helped boost the careers of many writers [such as Alice Munro, Timothy Findley, Mordecai Richler, Margaret Atwood and Leonard Cohen].
[. . .]
Barry Morse, 89, actor-director best known as the police detective in the TV series The Fugitive.
[. . .]
Jeff Healey, 41, rock, blues and jazz musician who won a Juno in 1990 for entertainer of the year, after a battle with cancer that robbed him of his sight when he was a baby.
[. . .]
Simon Reisman, 88, Canada’s chief free-trade negotiator during talks with the United States in the late 1980s.

Geoffrey Pearson, 80, Canadian ambassador to the Soviet Union and envoy to the United Nations who inherited his father prime minister Lester Pearson’s fascination with international affairs and dedication to peace.
[. . .]
Beryl Plumptre, 99, prime minister Pierre Trudeau’s anti-inflation watchdog.
[. . .]
Eddy Arnold, 89, country music superstar known for a pop-country sound, with hits such as Make the World Go Away.

Arthur Kroeger, 75, known as the “dean of deputy ministers” whose career spanned six prime ministers and included the reformation of the Crow’s Nest Pass freight rate that allowed Canada’s railways to survive.
[. . .]
Dr. Sheela Basrur, 51, a trusted source of information through the 2003 SARS crisis as the medical officer of health for the city of Toronto.
[. . .]
John Templeton, 95, mutual-fund pioneer, investor and philanthropist who used Canada as a springboard to great wealth.
[. . .]
Thomas Bata, 93, descendent of generations of eastern European cobblers and builder of the Bata shoe empire.

Erik Nielsen [brother of actor Leslie Nielsen], 84, the Yukon’s longest-serving member of Parliament (1957-1987) who also served as deputy prime minister under prime minister Brian Mulroney.
[. . .]
Marion Dewar, 80, former Ottawa mayor and MP remembered for her program to help Vietnamese boat people find new lives in Canada.
[. . .]
Ben Weider, 85, businessperson, philanthropist and [Napoleon] scholar best known for founding the International Federation of BodyBuilders with his brother Joe.
[. . .]
Charles Dubin, 87, chief justice of Ontario, head of an inquiry into drug use in amateur sport.
[. . .]
Ted Rogers, 75, who built Rogers Communications from a single radio station into Canada’s largest wireless, cable and media company and owner of the Toronto Blue Jays.
[. . .]
Gordon Fairweather, 85, first head of Canada’s human rights commission.

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