Self-represented litigants now permanent part of justice system

Last Tuesday, May 7th, the report of an 18-month research project that examined the experience of 259 self-represented litigants in Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia was released.

Professor Julie Macfarlane

Author of the study, Julie Macfarlane, a law professor at the University of Windsor, notes:

“People aren’t doing this because they woke up one morning and thought, ‘I think I fancy myself as (TV lawyer) Perry Mason […] “They’re doing it because they cannot afford to pay a lawyer. This isn’t about choice: this is about necessity.”

One of the report’s key recommendations is the need to recognize “that self-represented litigants — by necessity — are now a permanent part of the justice system.”

Flowing from this central recommendation are related proposals:

  • “develop[…] low-cost support services for [self-represented] litigants, many of whom simply want guidance and coaching
  • “the law community [should] consider creating more choices for clients in accessing lawyers — in particular in the financial structure of legal services [and]
  • [there should be] “an “open­-minded re­-examination” of the rules that protect the role of lawyers while limiting the roles of other legally trained professionals.”


The complete Canadian Press news report of this study can be read by clicking here.

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